Teaching

Sessional Faculty
University of British Columbia
January-April 2021

FIST 332 - Studies in Genre
Genre Cinema: from Classical Hollywood to Global Contemporary
Genre cinema theory was shaped by Classical Hollywood Cinema yet the most exciting innovations and developments in genre cinema today have happened in largely non-western contexts (think Parasite 2019 Dir. Bong Joon-Ho). From the Western, to Melodrama, to Thriller films, (and all of the subgenres in-between) we will examine the origins of genre theory within a framework that (re)evaluates how genre cinema manifests in a contemporary and global context. How does a cross-cultural analysis of genre cinema reveal diverse culturally and politically rooted histories, traditions, and functions beyond Anglo-saxon media monopolies? How can a trans-historical, cross-cultural examination of genre cinema expand how we look at it now and its importance (or not) today? These are some of the questions we will explore in this class on genre cinema as we move into borderless territories of film studies and genre bending theories.

Sessional Faculty
University of British Columbia
January-April 2021

FIST 220 - Classical Hollywood Cinema

Classical Hollywood Cinema in Dialogue
Over the course of film history, how have filmmakers engaged with the legacy of classical Hollywood film? How are the limitations of Classical Hollywood cinema, (censorship laws, Hays code, hegemonic worldviews, orientalization), examined within contemporary frameworks? How has the monolith of Classical Hollywood Cinema produced Otherness? While the political-ideological-cultural implications of Hollywood can’t be understated, today we are in a position to examine Classical Hollywood cinema through critical race, decolonial, and feminist frames. In this course, we will take on Classical Hollywood Cinema as it dialogues with our contemporary moment, otherness, racial justice, queerness, feminism, pandemics and our lived realities and experiences.

Sessional Faculty
Emily Carr University of Art + Design
January-April 2021

AHIS 336 - History + Contemporary Movements

Speculative worldmakings and the possibilities of radically different worldviews
As many before have astutely stated, a change in the real is impossible without a simultaneous change in the imaginary (Irigaray). As we contemplate the catastrophe of colonial capitalism in a pandemic world, how do speculative narratives allow us to imagine/ expand/ problematize our world(s) otherwise? How does movement organizing (i.e. Black Lives Matter – BLM, Movimento Sem Terra - MST) contribute to otherwise worldings? How have others fought for (and how can we as artist-researchers contribute to) racial justice, climate and earth justice, multispecies and other-than-human sovereignties? These are some of the questions we will explore through interdisciplinary and undisciplined methods. We will examine aesthetic, philosophical, cosmological, and practical questions from domains of knowledge pertaining to speculative worldmaking in order to better understand the global condition and imagine otherwise. We will read, attend screenings, discuss, share and co-create, as we delve into some of the questions examined from diverse fields of inquiry and contexts of production. From Indigenous knowledge systems, Afro-Futurisms, Latin American syncretisms, ecofeminisms, and movement organizing, we will move across hemispheres and temporalities as part of our pursuit on speculative worldmaking. 

Sessional Faculty
Emily Carr University of Art + Design
September - December 2020

FNDT 165 - Core Interdisciplinary Studio

Foundation Core is an introduction to a breadth of conceptual, technical and disciplinary approaches that includes 2D, 3D and 4D disciplines. Exploring different forms of conceptual and material-based inquiry, this studio course focuses on the understanding and articulation of core values shared across contemporary art, design, and media disciplines. Foundation Core emphasizes practices and concepts that provide a solid platform for any of the degree-focused studio cores offered in the second semester.

Student artwork by Tara Osan used with permission.
Student Artwork by Tara Osan used with permission. Outdoor installation and media art project still. 

Sessional Faculty
Emily Carr University of Art + Design
January - April 2020

MHIS 429 - Topics in Film + Media Theory

Re-visioning Genre Theory
In this course, we will explore revisionist genre theory through a geo-political, racialized, decolonial, and feminist lens. How are generic categories revisited, subverted, and re-signified through non-western perspectives? This larger question will be approached through a closer look at three specific genre categories, such as the western, the horror film, and the thriller. How have these genres been revisited from an Indigenous and racialized perspective, and how have they responded to social changes in the 21st century? These are some of the questions we will examine through re-visioning and revisionist perspectives of under-represented voices in film history. Coursework involves attending mandatory screenings, participating in class discussions, engaging in theoretical readings, class presentations, and writing assignments.

Sessional Faculty
Emily Carr University of Art + Design
January - April 2020

FNDT 165 - Video Essentials
Encompassing aspects of documentary, performance, narrative and sampled footage, this course introduces students to the technical fundamentals of cinematic theories, practices, and techniques including camera, sound, lighting, and computer editing. We will explore and practice how these tools can be developed for artistic use within the medium of film and video.

Sessional Faculty
University of British Columbia
September - December 2019

FIST 434G - Studies in Film
Refiguring Futurisms

We will time travel “Black to the Future”, “South to the Future” and look at alternative futuring in Native Science Fiction through fluid temporalities that assert pasts, presents, and futures for a diversity of peoples. With a focus on Afro and Indigenous futurism, and examples from queer and South Asian futurisms, this course will take an interdisciplinary approach to exploring the intersections of oral histories, technologies, imaginations, race, diasporas, colonization, problematic historicizations, liberation, and futurities.

Sessional Faculty
Simon Fraser University (SIAT)
September - December 2019

IAT 202 New Media Images

New Media Images, IAT 202, is an introduction to historical, aesthetic, theoretical and practical issues in digital video production. In this course, students will simultaneously develop technical ability and creative awareness through the combination of lectures, tutorials, projects and hands- on practice. Project planning and conceptualization will be emphasized. Image composition, the basics of soundtrack design, visual effects and editing grammars will be explored toward the aim of creating a final video project.

Sessional Faculty
Emily Carr University of Art + Design
January - April 2019

MHIS 429 - Topics in Film + Media Theory

Transgressive Gazes across the Americas – Cinema through a women centric lens 
From Alanis Obomsawin, Ann Marie Fleming, Amanda Strong in Canada to Chicana filmmakers in the US (i.e. Lourdes Portillo, Sylvia Morales), to Latin American filmmakers (Marta Rodriguez [Colombia]), Patricia Ferreira Yxapy [Brazil], Lucrecia Martel [Argentina]), we will examine the intersectional politics evidenced in their films. This examination will feature discussions grounded in critical approaches to, and analyses of, the historical, theoretical, political, social, economic, and cultural framework of these filmmakers. We will also be revisiting concepts from film theory, such as cult theory and auteur theory, which are traditionally centred around the Euro-Western white male imaginary in order to subvert, transgress, and redefine film theory from women and women of color perspectives.

Sessional Faculty
University of British Columbia
January - April 2017

FIST 434G - Studies in Film
Poetry and Politics in Latin American Cinema
“An underdeveloped country isn’t obliged to have an underdeveloped art” (Glauber Rocha). The need to decolonize film theory and history is the imperative of this course. Cinema from the global south is not an addendum to ‘First World Cinema’; the majority of world cinema is actually produced in the “Third World”. By mapping the vibrant, often neglected, legacy of Latin American cinema, we will revisit films from New Latin American Cinema to more contemporary films from the continent in order to delve into the poetry and politics of a subjective repertoire of films. By grounding our critical approach and analyses in the historical, theoretical, political, social, economic, and cultural framework that these films were created in, “Poetry and Politics in Latin American Cinema” aims to deconstruct some of the dominant, oppressive discourses and colonial systems that provoked the counter-narratives and resistance manifest in these cinematic works. The idea is to give students a solid foundation in Third Cinema theory and its Latin American origins and legacy in contemporary Latin American film production.